308 DAYS UNTIL
May 28 – June 3, 2018

Honorees Home the memorial Honorees

2004 : Lee Trevino & Joyce Wethered

2004 Memorial Tournament Honoree

LEE TREVINO
Born in Dallas, Texas, “Super Mex” was raised by his mother who worked as a house cleaner, and his grandfather, who was a gravedigger. Lee’s family home was located at the back of a golf course, and he grew up watching golfers play.

Entirely self-taught at first, Trevino
eventually became the protégé of Hardy Greenwood, owner of Hardy’s Driving Range in Dallas.  Working as a caddie and a green keeper to stay close to the game he loved, Trevino’s playing skills matured later than most Hall of Famers.  
After serving with the Marines from ages 17-21, Trevino became a golf professional in 1960, and took his first job working as an assistant in El Paso, TX, before joining the professional golf circuit in 1966. In 1967, Trevino was named Rookie of the Year.  His first major victory came at the 1968 U.S. Open at the age of 29.

In the course of his career, Trevino won 75 professional tournaments and six major championships: the U.S. Open twice (1968, 1971), back-to-back British Opens in 1971 and 1972, and the PGA Championship in 1974 and 1984, his final TOUR victory at age 44.  

The U.S. Ryder Cup Captain in 1985, Trevino played on six American teams.  He also teamed with Jack Nicklaus in 1971 to win the World Cup.  Trevino says his greatest sports moment came when he beat Nicklaus in an 18-hole playoff in the 1971 U. S. Open at Merion.  

Winning the Vardon Trophy for low scoring average five times, Trevino was named PGA Player of the Year and the Associated Press and Sports Illustrated’s Athlete of the Year in 1971.  He was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1981.

Trevino is married to wife Claudia and has four sons, and two daughters.

JOYCE WETHERED
Posthumous Honoree

Born in Devon, England, Joyce Wethered is remembered as one of the greatest women golfers of all time.  Her victories included five English Amateur and four British Ladies Amateur championships.

Growing up in Southern England, Wethered spent her summer vacations at her parents’ summer home in Scotland.  It was there that she and her brother, Roger, developed their skills as golfers.  Roger went on to lose the British Open in a playoff in 1921 as an amateur, and his skills at the game gave his sister the challenge she needed to develop competitively.

In 1920, Wethered, who had only one formal golf lesson as a child, came to prominence while still a teenager by beating England’s then leading woman golfer, Cecil Leitch, to win the 1920 English Ladies Championship.  But Wethered’s primary career lasted only nine years and, in that time, she won five consecutive English Amateur titles and four British Ladies titles.  Her forte was accuracy and power.  The great American amateur, Bobby Jones, described her as “the greatest golfer of all time, man or woman,” and claimed she possessed the finest swing he had ever seen.  In 1924, she married a lord of the realm and became known as Lady Heathcote-Armory.

Four years after retiring, Wethered came back to contest the British Ladies Championship, primarily for the opportunity to compete against Glenna Colette, America’s top female golfer of the 1920’s.  Not only did Wethered beat Colette, she also won the tournament.  Afterwards, Wethered retired totally from competitive golf, and became golf manager of a London store, which caused her to lose her amateur status.
Interestingly, when Wethered became president of the English Ladies Golf Union in 1954, the R & A re-instated her amateur status, thus enabling her to hold the office legitimately.  She later retired to her husband’s estate in Devon, where she became an enthusiastic and expert gardener.

Joyce Wethered is the measure by which great women golfers are judged.  She is remembered fondly not only because of her success, but for her dedication to the sport and for her appealing personality.